Category Archives: Enzyme Kinetics

New Modeling Book Published

I am happy to announce the publication of my new book this March: Essentials of Biochemical Modeling. Computer models of biochemical systems are starting to play an increasingly important role in modern systems and synthetic biology. This monograph introduces students to … Continue reading

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Reversibility and Product Inhibition

It is common in biochemistry to categorize reactions as either reversible or irreversible. What do we mean by these terms? Let’s look at a simple reaction such as:     where A is transformed to B. The rate of reaction … Continue reading

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Bottlenecks and Slow Steps – again

I’ve written a few articles on this blog about the irrationality of bottlenecks and slow steps in metabolism, hoping that one day my fellow scientists will feel the same. Sadly it is not true and maybe I should write more … Continue reading

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Choke points, Load points, Hots spots and Key steps

Choke points, load points, hot spots, key steps and critical steps are some of the many phrases that have been coined to describe places in a biochemical network where perturbations are said to make a difference. Locating these places is … Continue reading

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Michael Savageau’s Book in Print Again

I’ve been meaning to mention this for some time but Michael Savageau book, ‘Biochemical Systems Analysis’ is available in print again in the form of a paperback from amazon for only $29.95. I grew up with this book as an … Continue reading

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Electronic Gene Circuit

The figure below shows a single unit from the Microryza gene network circuit project. The circuit models a transcription factor that acts as a repressor. The output from the circuit is the level of protein which can be fed into … Continue reading

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Misconceptions in Metabolism II

A week ago I wrote about some misconceptions in metabolism that arose from a trip to a systems biology workshop in Holland. This week I discovered that Nature is perpetrating similar misconceptions in their News and Views section. I came … Continue reading

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Crowd Funding: Microryza

There is a new crowd funding site has just started that specializes in funding research. Called Microryza, the organization aims to focus on funding risky research projects or educational outreach efforts. Yours truly submitted one of the first projects (no affiliation to the … Continue reading

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Jim Burns’ Ph.D Thesis

Why on earth should anyone would want to download a Ph.D thesis that is now almost 40 years old and presumably way out of date and completely irrelevant in today’s terabyte data world? Well for one, Jim’s thesis is an … Continue reading

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It’s Christmas!

It’s Christmas, term is winding down at the University, the students are going home and than means spare time to do something other than official work. Here is a small Windows App I wrote that simulates a simple enzyme mechanism. … Continue reading

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