Category Archives: Molecular Biology

New Modeling Book Published

I am happy to announce the publication of my new book this March: Essentials of Biochemical Modeling.¬†Computer models of biochemical systems are starting to play an increasingly important role in modern systems and synthetic biology. This monograph introduces students to … Continue reading

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Whole Cell Models

We’ve seen in the last couple of years increased interest in building whole cell models, that is computer models that attempt to simulate a whole organism. The most recent attempt was by Karr et al, published in Cell, 2012, 150(2), … Continue reading

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Synthetic Biology: It’s an analog world

I significant paper on synthetic biology got published this week by an innovative group from MIT (Daniel et al). Read our News and Views article that discusses the importance of the paper.

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Choke points, Load points, Hots spots and Key steps

Choke points, load points, hot spots, key steps and critical steps are some of the many phrases that have been coined to describe places in a biochemical network where perturbations are said to make a difference. Locating these places is … Continue reading

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Electronic Gene Circuit

The figure below shows a single unit from the Microryza gene network circuit project. The circuit models a transcription factor that acts as a repressor. The output from the circuit is the level of protein which can be fed into … Continue reading

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Misconceptions in Metabolism II

A week ago I wrote about some misconceptions in metabolism that arose from a trip to a systems biology workshop in Holland. This week I discovered that Nature is perpetrating similar misconceptions in their News and Views section. I came … Continue reading

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NCI Partners with the DREAM Project

Two acronyms in one title, translated the title says: The National Cancer Institute Partners with the¬†Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods. Perhaps not much help but actually this is a great idea. The National Caner Institute is partnering with … Continue reading

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Did Venter Create Life?

Perhaps a bit late but the topic of whether Venter actually created new life came up again in a recent workshop I was at, the conclusion: No So what did he do? By analogy what he did was akin to … Continue reading

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Teaching Teachers about Synthetic Biology

Natalie Kuldell is an accomplished instructor at MIT where she teaches biological engineering, including synthetic biology and design. She has also recently set up the BioBuilder web site which is geared towards providing educational and other resources for the synthetic … Continue reading

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Tenure Track Position – Synthetic Biology

Tenure Track Position in Synthetic Biology at UW 21th February 2012 The University of Washington Department of Bioengineering Invites Applications for Tenure Track Position in Synthetic Biology The Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington (UW) invites applications for … Continue reading

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